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Entries in conversion (57)

Friday
Jan152016

The Ancient Party Barn

OMG I am in love. You all know how much we love a good conversion..... This award-winning conversion of an 18th century threshing barn, dairy and stables by London architecture and interior design firm Liddicoat & Goldhill is un-freaking-believable. Our task was to combine the quality of the surviving barn fragments with the texture and tone of their found materials. To maintain the barn’s brooding presence - and to provide security and a sense of protection from rolling Channel mists - the barn is usually kept in a closed state. However, industrial-scale kinetic mechanisms create openings that address key views into the countryside. Massive, insulated shutters recall the original barn doors, and protect a vast rotating window operated by an adapted chain-lift. To the East front, an American aircraft-hangar door allows the exterior to concertina upwards, creating a canopy over the dining terrace and revealing ribbon glazing within. A single rooflight, running the length of the main roof’s ridge provides steady ambient light to the living spaces.  

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Monday
Jan112016

A loft in a former marmalade factory

I have become a huge fan of Polish/German interior and furniture design studio Loft Szczecin and wanted to share one of their latest projects. Designer Ewa Adamiak kindly sent over some info. Our project was done in a former warehouse of a marmalade factory, which operated before World War II in Szczecin (Poland). The project involved reconstruction of one of the open spaces for an apartment divided into 4 rooms (living room with a kitchenette, bedroom, office, bathroom). In the most part of the loft we preserved historic, wooden floors that have been restored. All the kitchen furniture were designed and built by Loft Szczecin. Countertops were made of white marble and kitchen furniture of plywood. The rest of the furnishing is vintage furniture and lamps from the 50s and 60s from Denmark, the Czech Republic, Poland and the Netherlands. The furniture have been renovated by Loft Szczecin. For decoration we used a poilsh rug from the 30s. All of that exposed brick is absolutely incredible. And those floors! And that sofa! (Check out previous features here, here and here)

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Thursday
Dec172015

A loft in a 19th century converted warehouse

I know I have often said "this is my dream loft!" but in all seriousness, THIS IS MY DREAM LOFT! The exposed brick and beams, and HOLY SMOKES WILL YOU LOOK AT THAT MEZZANINE! With direct access to the roof-top terrace and features an interior courtyard with a retractable glass roof. I die. By Andrew Franz Architect.

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Friday
Dec112015

A warehouse conversion in London

Warehouse conversions always excite me, especially when one of my favourite designers has had some part of it. This one-bedroom conversion on the third floor of a renovated Victorian warehouse was the home (and could still be?) of Ilse Crawford as seen way back in Jo's post from 2007, and is currently for sale. It was a collaboration between Ilse, Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen and 6a Architects. The long wall of storage hides the front door and a washroom. The bookcases along the opposite wall make me giddy - to have so much open storage for displaying books and trinkets! (Although the current state of clutter on the shelving is making me have a slight coronary). It is so bright with all those large windows, and OMG those Zellige tiles will forever be a favourite of mine. You can find details of this fabulous home on The Modern House

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Wednesday
Nov252015

Old school conversion

It is hard to believe this was once a school. This modern, bright and airy loft in Amsterdam is now home to a family of five. The teacher’s lounge became bedrooms and the classroom became the living space. The kitchen is fantastic! I especially love the wall of open storage over the sink cabinet section. Such a fun place to raise kids in. No worries about the floors getting scratched up (it's concrete) or one of the kids hiding somewhere and wrecking havoc (their toys are stashed in the play area under the stairs). By Standard Studio.

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