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Entries in South Africa (45)


A magical 160 year old home in Cape Town

As soon as I spotted this 1854 Cape Dutch home (located in Montagu, Cape Town) featured in Visi, I knew there was something magical about it. And when I read the story, I realized I was right. As the homeowners tell it: "For a year before we started renovating, I spent every weekend sleeping on a mattress on the floor of the empty entrance hall. It was important to do this, because only then did I hear the house. I could hear her breathe. I could hear the creaking of the wood, the sounds the pipes make, how the wind whispers through the rooms and where she ached. And in doing so I realised that ours would have to be a historical renovation; it wasn’t so much what we wanted the house to be but rather what it should be." You can read the rest of the story here. (Photos: Micky Hoyle)

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The coolest teen hangout

Man, do I ever wish I had a place to hang out in that was this cool growing up. I'm going to bet this teen suddenly became a VERY popular kid when this project was completed. What can only be described as the ultimate 'man cave', Inhouse Brand Architects has converted the unused lounge area of a Fresnaye (Cape Town, South Africa) residence into an industrial-inspired dream pad for the family’s lucky teenage boy and his friends. Polished concrete flooring encompasses the entire room and sets the foundation for the interior scheme. 

Another striking design feature comes in the form of a grandiose, curved timber wave that cascades from the ceiling down to the floor to create an extraordinary zone for watching movies. This “wave" is crafted out of steel fins that are clad with timber and lit up with three LED strips. It is kitted out with surround sound to produce a genuine movie theatre experience.

Next to the bar and adjacent the timber wave is comfortable booth seating. Framed with timber and upholstered in inviting shades of indigo, this nook provides an enticing 'chill' spot.

A fully functional concrete skate bowl plays a major part in the design. To embellish this remarkable feature, emerging South African street artist, Jack Fox, applied his signature illustrations to the walls surrounding the bowl. 


A modern stone farmhouse in South Africa

On the outskirts of the town of Marble Hall in South Africa, bordered by natural bush, this modern family home references the raw, simple beauty of traditional South African farm architecture. With its solid stone and concrete walls, the house turns its back on the public providing protection for the private areas within. Still with all its solidity and mass the spaces within are surprising light and open. House Kleynhans by Pretoria-based Thomas Gouws Architects.

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Revisting Generation

It has been a while since I featured the work of Generation from South Africa. Not only do they carry some pretty spectacular furniture, but their spaces are polished, inviting and hard to spot any overdone trends here! As a side note I just took a look at their sofa range and WOW. I typically find sofas boring but these really do it for me. (And this isn't a sponsored post for the record)

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Sunday at the brewery

Instead of spending a fourth day in a row painting, I am dreaming about being in Stellenboschis, South Africa at this wonderful brewery called Wild Clover. Designed by Inhouse, this brewery also comprises a restaurant and deli and is a really fun space. The central focus of the space is no doubt the brewery itself. This room is sheathed in glass, allowing guests to view the beer-making process, which reinforces the foundations of the brand. manner. The bar and tasting area display impressive design elements such as striking pendant fittings suspended overhead that literally put the location's name up in lights! Guests can make a quick pitstop at the feature bar, which is crafted from timber and edged with beveled tiles, to sample Wild Clover’s special brews. Other design elements contribute to the contemporary aesthetic, such as randomly placed white and grey hexagonal tiles amalgamated into the sealed concrete flooring. Another truly unique feature comprises four floor-to-ceiling Perspex columns, each containing an essential ingredient of beer: yeast, barely, hops and water. To create a sense of privacy, a steel screen was installed to conceal the bathroom doors from the tasting room. The clever use of beer bottles built into this structure further reinforces the brand personality. Additionally, refurbished wine barrel lids are displayed on the wall parallel. The restaurant area is decorated with unusual brass pipe light fittings that heighten the undeniably quirky aesthetic. Brown banquet leather seating offers a comfortable yet stylish zone to enjoy the many delicious delights available from the outlet’s deli and kitchen.

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