Displaying posts labeled "Concrete"

The Yard House

Posted on Tue, 21 Aug 2018 by KiM

Wow do I ever love this house! It has just enough unusual features to fascinate me and has me imagining how I would decorate it. Also, check out the bathroom!!! How fun to use vintage fixtures in typical retro colours against a black wall. LOVE THAT!! Currently for sale via The Modern House. Here are some details: This remarkably conceived four-bedroom house, designed by award-winning designer Jonathan Tuckey, is arranged around a central courtyard on a secluded plot just behind Lordship Lane in East Dulwich. The materials utilised throughout draw from the robust character of the adjacent brick buildings and the raw qualities of the ‘yard’ site. While concrete blocks are prominently combined with a timber-and-steel superstructure frame, the house’s defining element is certainly the courtyard facade, lined in translucent polycarbonate Rodeca panels. The courtyard forms the primary space around which the life of the house revolves. Tuckey envisioned this area as a kind of outdoor room to which all the main interior spaces are connected. North-facing workshops are placed nearest to the street entrance, with the bedroom wing opposite. The two wings are connected by a double-height living and dining central section. The courtyard is expressed as a formal, ordered space which gives the house a dignified character and enables the creation of a proper ‘front’ to the building by placing the main entrance centrally within this space. The stairs to the first floor arrive above this entrance, with the porch roof acting as a balcony, giving views through the courtyard to the gardens below.

Apartment Musico Iturbi

Posted on Mon, 9 Jul 2018 by midcenturyjo

Exposed brick and rustic beams. Layer upon layer of history revealed. Within the stripped shell of an old building in Valencia, Spain is an elegant yet minimalist modern apartment by London-based Roberto Di Donato Architecture. A perfect marriage of old and new, refined and rustic.


Photography by João Morgado

Ritz&Ghougassian

Posted on Fri, 15 Jun 2018 by midcenturyjo

A heritage frontage and a public lane to the side, the desire for modern living with privacy and light. Courtyards and high windows, concrete blocks and polished floors warmed by banks of rich timber storage. Sleek and stylish urban living. Highbury Grove by Ritz&Ghougassian.


Photography by Tom Blachford

Introducing my dream home!

Posted on Thu, 14 Jun 2018 by KiM

I’m almost at a loss for words. This home in Wentworth-Nord, Québec designed by Montréal architect Alain Carle is so incredibly beautiful from the outside in. Most of the wood and stone throughout the house are reclaimed and are what really make this home special. Alongside the concrete floors, plaster walls and crittall windows, it is a winning combination. Bonus points for the dark stained wood adding in some moody drama. This is everything I love. (Photos: James Brittain)

A former brewery cooperage in Central London

Posted on Mon, 7 May 2018 by KiM

We’re huge fans of conversions here at DTI and this one is….majestic being the first word that comes to mind. That staircase!!!  Believed to have built in the early 1900s, this former brewery cooperage on a tight site in Central London had already been in residential use since the 1990s. By stripping back to the buildings fabric and preserving its original features it was possible to bring a new understanding to its potential. The existing basement was extended laterally to create a large open-plan family living area over which rises a triple height atrium – a space around which much of the accommodation is structured and through which passes a dramatic feature staircase. The vertical extension rises from the top of the building and is occupied by bedrooms and a generous roof terrace with far-reaching roof-top views. To distinguish this extension from the original brick structure a system of patinated bronze cladding panels and glass has been used. By Chris Dyson Architects. (Photos: Peter Landers)

See more of Chris Dyson’s work here, here and here.