Displaying posts labeled "Tile"

Atelier Vime

Posted on Mon, 12 Oct 2020 by KiM

I have been following Atelier Vime for some time now on Instagram, and it finally dawned on me that I should feature this truly magical French shop/design studio here on the blog. They are a vintage basketry shop and producer of wicker, rattan and rope furniture, located in Vallabrègues in an 18th century hôtel particulier. You would never know their photos were actually “product” shots as the architectural details and styling of the spaces is consistently exemplary.

The rough house

Posted on Tue, 6 Oct 2020 by KiM

You would have a difficult time convincing me there that there was anything more beautiful than exposed wood beams, trim-free plaster walls, old-world tiled and raw wood floors. This home in Limburg, The Netherlands, is breathtaking. Interior design by Niels Maier. Photos by Thomas De Bruyne.

A moody Swedish villa

Posted on Sun, 27 Sep 2020 by KiM

This home in Särö, Sweden I spotted on Residence ticks all the right boxes for me. The warm neutral walls accentuate the architecture, the green tile in the kitchen is blowing my mind, and the eclectic mix of eras in the furniture really lends itself to a storied interior. (Photos: Fanny Hansson)

What was formerly a derelict Madrid apartment void of any of its original neoclassical architecture, is now been completely restored and transformed with the help of interior designer Maria Santos. No detail forgotten, no stone left unturned (or in this case, no book spine facing forwards) it is a beautifully curated with Parisian flair. (Photos: Montse Garriga)

I came across this Stockholm apartment on sköna hem and did a double take for a couple of reasons. First, it was suspect that this was a Swedish home. Those lovely Swedes aren’t exactly known for their colourful homes. Second, it was so unique and over the top that I needed to review a second and third time to make sure I didn’t miss anything. A layered space is always a win in my book. I want to discover something new at each glance. If I can evaluate a room in its entirety in 3 seconds, I am bored. Kudos to designer Pontus Nilvander for holding my attention for well beyond 3 seconds. (Photos: Johan Carlsson)