Displaying posts labeled "Wood"

Madeleine Blanchfield in Fiji

Posted on Wed, 24 Apr 2013 by midcenturyjo

Please take me away to this stunning home in Fiji by Madeleine Blanchfield. All the elements of Blanchfield’s modern Australian aesthetic are there but layered with a rich referencing of island style. A perfect holiday home or, if I had my way, a perfect forever home. Kedere rawa ni lako vata?

Mole Architects

Posted on Thu, 18 Apr 2013 by KiM

Mole Architects is a British firm established by Meredith Bowles, and their portfolio knocked my socks off. Their homes are magical, and have made me rethink all the images in my head of what I want for my next house. Yes please to a bedroom tucked under a massively curved roof! And I LOVE the sunken window with the protruding frame in the second last photo. 

Fox Johnston

Posted on Thu, 18 Apr 2013 by midcenturyjo

A small inner city block with existing worker’s cottage. How to increase the living areas on such a small footprint? By wrapping the extension around the house and borrowing space from both the inside and outside “rooms”, maximising volume and light. A beautiful palette of natural finishes, simple and textural. Clever use of space for an inner city family. The Balmain House by Fox Johnston.

The chalet

Posted on Wed, 17 Apr 2013 by midcenturyjo

A little escape to Switzerland to this chalet by Andreas Fuhrimann Gabbrielle Hächler Architects. Concrete, plywood and views from the beanbags. A minimalist, modern twist on the traditional. Love the staircase and its storage. Love the reinterpretation of the historic vernacular.

Jim Stephenson and the Shingle House

Posted on Tue, 26 Mar 2013 by midcenturyjo

By now many of us have seen (and admired) the Shingle House by NORD. A beautifully simple house in tune with its environment. What could be better? Enter architectural photographer Jim Stephenson. A house that I like becomes a house that I want. His deep love of the built environment and his ability to interpret how people interact with a space make his photos come alive. So often a space is depicted as cold and clinical but architecturally perfect. By including people the home becomes more intimate, more real, more wonderful.