Displaying posts labeled "Stone"

Block

Posted on Mon, 6 Jan 2014 by midcenturyjo

A tight budget may have dictated the use of simple, inexpensive building materials but architects Carter Williamson have taken the humble concrete block and created an elegant 2 storey house in Camperdown, Sydney that not only respects its Victorian era neighbours but provides a modern shell with character and sense of space and light that belies the hefty building block.

Stalking Harry Seidler

Posted on Sat, 7 Dec 2013 by midcenturyjo

I’m stalking a modernist gem today. Stalking a piece of Australian architectural history. My Australian midcentury modern friends will be going weak at the knees. Here’s what the real esate agent says… “We live in a disposable society, in an age when so many things in life are too often forgotten or disposed of to make room for bigger and newer things. So it’s a precious surprise when one encounters a stunning home that has survived the times, continuing to act as a testament to the era and style of which it was built. It’s even more precious, when the architect who designed the home intelligently and specifically, is none other than the father of Australian modern architecture, Harry Seidler.” Located in Beaumont, South Australia it is his only home built in this state.

What I love the most is how it is a well loved family home, that kids hang aeroplanes from the ceiling and maps and medals from the walls, that updates are sympathetic to the era and that the pool is original! A small midcentury marvel well loved and well used by a modern family. Perfect and imperfect. Link here while it lasts. (Thanks Andrea for finding this one for us.)

Cat Hill Barn

Posted on Wed, 27 Nov 2013 by midcenturyjo

Nestled in the rolling hills of Yorkshire is this award winning renovation of a grade ll listed, 16th century barn. Liverpool based Snook Architects have be restrained in their approach. The open plan space is contemporary but the character of the historic barn is not compromised. Carefully avoiding the twee and the clichéd it is a minimalist exultation of the bones of a once working rural structure.

4 Floors

Posted on Wed, 27 Nov 2013 by midcenturyjo

Four apartments over four floors in Istanbul, Turkey. A contemporary renovation of an historic building by designer and artist Sema Topaloğlu. Within a tradition of craft and craftsmanship Topaloğlu weaves her magic creating an earthy but elegant series of rooms that respect the bones of the building while overlaying it with a new history of bespoke pieces. These beautiful apartments are not locked away from us though. 4 Floors Istanbul provides boutique accommodation where mine host is Topaloğlu’s brother Murat. I think a trip to Turkey was just added to my bucket list.

A skier’s dream retreat

Posted on Tue, 12 Nov 2013 by KiM

I detest winter. I don’t participate in any winter sports because that would mean being outside (although I have been saying for a few years that I should buy some skates since I live a 10 minute walk from the world’s largest skating rink). I’d consider taking up skiing if it meant getting to bunk in a place like this! Interior Designer Len Cotsovolos, unveils his latest contemporary architectural design at the Yellowstone Club – a private residential ski resort community in Big Sky, Montana, where he designed a custom 11,000 square foot vacation retreat that epitomizes comfort. “To understand this home, you must start from the inside,” explains Cotsovolos, “the home was designed from the inside out, while trying to bring the outside in”. Although this property shares the mountainside with classic American vernacular log cabin estates, Cotsovolos, with LC2 Design Services has styled this dream home to express modern mountain luxury…with just the right amount of Vegas “bling”. Nestled among the tall pines of the Rocky Mountains at an elevation of 10,500 feet, this custom home reflects characteristics of Modernist architecture, which typically features glass walls, post-and-beam construction, exposed steel, and open floor plans; however, Cotsovolos also introduced unique finishes, opulent furnishings, and other details, which he sourced worldwide to create a warm, dark and mysterious home that is internationally inspired. It’s pretty spectacular, and the organic nature of the materials definitively ups the glam factor of your typical cabin in the woods.