A funky Beverly Hills home

Posted on Tue, 16 Jul 2019 by KiM

Jenn Feldman is a designer-to-always-keep-an-eye-on because her ballsy, art-filled style is always on the top of of my list. This recent project of her in a Beverly Hills home speaks to me on so many levels. Love every bit of it. (More features on her work here)

Blues in an Ibizan holiday villa

Posted on Tue, 16 Jul 2019 by KiM

Hubert Zandberg, one of my favourite designers for about as long as this blog has existed, was tasked with creating a Mediterranean melting pot for his client’s holiday home. He combined a paired-back blue and white colour scheme with a plethora of neutral textures and earthy elements. The mix of locally sourced finishes, bespoke furniture and vintage finds resulted in a relaxed home for the family to refuel in a spectacular setting – Torre Vedra, Ibiza. It is so serene and welcoming.

Restaurant style – Bar M

Posted on Sun, 14 Jul 2019 by KiM

Sunday dinner at a sexy Italian restaurant? Count me in! Bar M in Sydney, Australia is designed by Jason Mowen and is an an incredible industrial space with tons of exposed bricks (SWOON!). Super sexy with red leather banquettes, a gold and brass bar, and projections of stars like Sophia Loren, Audrey Hepburn, Dean Martin, Danny DeVito and others grace the walls. And bring on the pasta!

A designer’s light-filled Texas home

Posted on Fri, 12 Jul 2019 by KiM

Leslie Jenkins of Jenkins Interiors lives in a beautiful 1940’s home in Tyler, Texas and it showcases her signature style of marrying contemporary furnishings with rare artwork and European antiques (that she sources herself on buying trips abroad) and the result is elegant without being overdone or too precious. I admire her use of colour, again not overdone and used in just the right amounts.

I just can’t get enough of Italian design firm Marcante Testa. They absolutely blow my mind with their use of colour, materials like brass, wood and marble, and their attention to detail of every square inch of their spaces. What I would give to be a fly on the wall in one of their design sessions. I mean, read this description and you’ll see what I mean. For this apartment, set within a building from the late 1960 on Corso Sempione, the Turin-based duo has applied its immediately recognizable style to reinterpret a typical bourgeois Milanese home in a highly original way. The floor in “Cipollino Tirreno” marble extends from the entrance hall to the living room, even being used on the walls and “closing” at the ceiling to frame a view of Milan that appears almost like a meditative landscape. Moving towards the dining room, this material gives way to “Verde Alpi” marble, which becomes a “carpet” on the floor for the dining table, a wallcovering, and even furniture itself in the form of a shelf on which to place objects. The floor in “Cipollino Tirreno” marble extends from the entrance hall to the living room, even being used on the walls and “closing” at the ceiling to frame a view of Milan that appears almost like a meditative landscape. Moving towards the dining room, this material gives way to “Verde Alpi” marble, which becomes a “carpet” on the floor for the dining table, a wallcovering, and even furniture itself in the form of a shelf on which to place objects. The cement tiles, the original wood floors updated with resin coatings, the colored metal structures for the doors in wire mesh glass, along with the materials used for the custom furnishings (laminate in the kitchen, the bath furnishings and the storage cabinets) reference the period in which the building was first constructed. They also “dampen” the high notes of more precious materials, such as the brass, marble, and the wallpapers and the fabrics of the wardrobe doors in the master bedroom. In this way, the interaction of materials, forms, colours and surfaces, as manipulated by the designers, is transformed and creates unexpected emotional reactions in the viewer linking the contrasting styles of everyday and sophisticated, high and low, past and contemporary.

Photos: Carola Ripamonti
And other features on Marcante Testa here and here