Displaying posts labeled "Brick"

Working on a Saturday

Posted on Sat, 13 Apr 2024 by midcenturyjo

It’s like I say week in week out. If you have to drag yourself into work on a weekend it helps if it’s somewhere stylish. PBS Studio by Patricia Bustos Studio.

Harmonious fusion

Posted on Mon, 25 Mar 2024 by midcenturyjo

Designed by Pandolfini Architects, South Yarra House melds sculptural and brutalist elements, crafting a distinctive aesthetic. Encased in concrete and glass, its interior boasts gallery-like expanses. Soft curves, clay-toned bricks, reeded glass, and walnut floors redefine space, complemented by Simone Haag‘s styling. Haag’s curation includes resin lamps, lambswool chairs, and hand-knotted rugs, striking a balance between austerity and warmth. Amidst neutral tones, textiles and art exude opulence, tempering the brutalist surfaces. This interplay extends to furniture, where sleek designs meet tactile elements, culminating in a harmonious fusion.

Photography by Lillie Thompson.

The unbearable beauty of minimalism

Posted on Mon, 11 Mar 2024 by midcenturyjo

This Victorian Terrace in Sydney’s Darlinghurst blends tranquillity with vibrancy. It’s both a serene sanctuary and a lively hub for music and gatherings. The design aimed for a minimalist stage for life’s theatre, balancing privacy with everyday living. Collaborative planning ensured every item found its place, creating an emptied vessel. The core idea was to design with a respect for empty space. Skylit voids mimic ceramic vessels, casting changing light and mood. Heritage meets contemporary with landscaped courtyards, while brick and timber textures define spaces. Embracing emptiness, the design reveals joy and meaning in simplicity. Vessel by Madeleine Blanchfield Architects.

Photography by Tom Ferguson.

When creativity pushes the limits of what craftsmanship can do…
Actually, it’s a pretty wild idea, yes, to build a house with barrel-vaulted concrete ceilings and everything else in red, hand-brushed bricks: walls, floors, partitions and fireplace with nonchalantly laid mortar. There is no doubt that you have to like the raw expression that designer Tulla Gudiksen and architect Max Gudiksen, inspired by Le Corbusier, massaged into all 155 m2 of the house at Elledamsvej 1 in 1972. 

This home is incredible. I love how raw and rough it appears but the curves of the ceiling add some softness. It admittedly is A LOT of brick but add a bunch of antique rugs and lots of textiles and I would be as happy as can be living here. Thank you Poul for sending us the real estate listing to this masterpiece.

Simple and hip

Posted on Wed, 28 Feb 2024 by midcenturyjo

“A modest and robust brick addition to an single-fronted weatherboard house, Brunswick house is a home for a young family. The extension is pragmatic and simple with the focus being on the quality of natural light and materiality within a dynamic space. The site slopes away to the rear, north facing backyard, providing an opportunity to step down and also bring the ceiling line up to both bring in light and demarcate spaces in the open plan kitchen, dining and living area.”

Modest it may be but this simple extension is full of contemporary cool. Solid and effective, hip and stylish. Brunswick House by Olaver Architecture.