Displaying posts labeled "Concrete"

A cool cave

Posted on Tue, 9 Mar 2021 by midcenturyjo

A juxtaposition of a concrete bunker with an expansive view of Sydney’s Pittwater, of solid and void, light and dark, rough concrete and smooth timber. A cool cave on a hot Australian day. Khayalethu Residence by Triibe in collaboration with CHROFI.

Jo shared the 17th century, 3,300 sq ft Milan palazzo of designer Vincenzo De Cotiis a few years ago and I recently stumbled upon it again and because it truly is one of the most exquisite homes I have ever seen I wanted to share it again. This is what taking the time to peel back years and years of layers can get you. And when you leave it raw and untreated, it is absolutely magical and something to be revered for years to come. (You can read more about it here and here)

Photos: Simon Watson, Joachim Wichmann

I hope to one day find myself with a home that needs serious renovations, where I make decisions on what original details should stay and mix it with clean lines of modern architecture. This apartment in the Literary Quarter of Madrid has beautiful textured walls and beams maintained from the original 1900 structure and it really makes the space that much more unique and intriguing. Designed by Marisa González-Llanos, via Elle Decor Spain, photos by Pablo Sarabia.

Collector House

Posted on Tue, 9 Feb 2021 by midcenturyjo

“The Collector House feels wonderfully relaxed. Sunlight streams in from the central skylight and fills the rooms. The view of the harbour, framed by jacaranda and eucalypts, and the ferries passing by all contribute to the overall sense of calm. It’s a barefoot house – warm and grounded, with space for loved ones to gather.”

There are touches of humour and art, honest materials and a sense of the Aussie vernacular. There are private spaces and places to come together. And then there’s the view. Collector House by Sydney-based interior designers Arent & Pyke.

Photography by Anson Smart

This landscaping is everything landscaping should be. Considerate of the colour scheme of the home (purple/magenta in this case), a mix of wood and concrete to keep it from being too harsh, terraced to easily create zones, includes a water feature, integrated lighting…. We transformed this garden from a weed-covered dirt hill into a beautiful living space with the use of terracing. Our goal for any garden is to make it functional, and this design utilizes every inch of space with an outdoor office, a vegetable/cutting garden, a dining deck, fire pit, and barbecue with seating area. These clients like to entertain, and can open their kitchen doors to connect directly with the garden. Built in wood and concrete benches add sculptural interest and the concrete bench absorbs warmth when the fire feature is lit. By Growsgreen.

Photos: Caitlin Atkinson and Growsgreen